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Michael Barnes

Preview: Leander family seeks cure for sons’ debilitating disease: The Revells unite against Duchenne.

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The Revell family. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman.

The Revell family. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman.

Here’s a short preview of a story that comes out in the American-Statesman on Saturday. It was a special honor to be able to report on Tim, Laura, Timothy and Andrew Revell. For the full story, go here — and spread the word on CureDuchenne.

Andrew and Timothy Revell. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman.

Andrew and Timothy Revell. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman.

Bursting with energy, Timothy and Andrew Revell are all over their Leander house. Their schoolwork is spread out on a counter near the kitchen, where their mother, Laura Revell, has been leading the boys through their lessons. When it is time to take a break and let a reporter ask questions of their salesman father, Tim Revell, the youngsters withdraw to a playroom where they have constructed an amazingly complicated track for mini-cars.

Laura Revell with her son Andrew. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman

Laura Revell with her son Andrew. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman

The sounds of their joyful curiosity and unforced companionship dance through the house. A single, unavoidable fact lingers over their lives: Timothy, 11, and Andrew, 8, grapple with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Almost no boys with the condition — and it’s virtually always boys who inherit the mutated gene that atrophies the body’s muscles — live past age 30.

Timothy Revell with his son Andrew. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman.

Timothy Revell with his son Andrew. Photo: Andy Sharp / American-Statesman.


“Our sons know they are different, that they are physically limited in things they can participate in,” father Tim says. “They don’t know the gory details. We chose to give them a normal life. Their daily routine is almost what every kid does.”