Amazing Sunday Statesman: Abbott vs Perry, Gary Cartwright, Central Texas Food, Larry Monroe Forever Bridge

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Details artwork from the mosaic of the Larry Monroe Forever Bridge in the Travis Heights neighborhood of Austin, Texas, on Thursday, June 18, 2015. The bridge mosaic was dedicated in remembrance of local DJ Larry Monroe, who died last year. Photo: Rodolfo Gonzalez.

Great day in the morning for the Austin American-Statesman, a sampling.

Details artwork from the mosaic of the Larry Monroe Forever Bridge in the Travis Heights neighborhood of Austin, Texas, on Thursday, June 18, 2015.  The bridge mosaic was dedicated in remembrance of local DJ Larry Monroe, who died last year.  Photo: Rodolfo Gonzalez.

Details artwork from the mosaic of the Larry Monroe Forever Bridge in the Travis Heights neighborhood of Austin, Texas, on Thursday, June 18, 2015. The bridge mosaic was dedicated in remembrance of local DJ Larry Monroe, who died last year. Photo: Rodolfo Gonzalez.

MUSIC + ARTS: Travis Heights mosaic bridge installation honors late DJ Larry Monroe. Taken from Peter Blackstock‘s story in the American-Statesman: “Gathering around the small pavilion stage at Little Stacy Park in Travis Heights on Saturday morning, a few hundred friends and fans of the late radio host Larry Monroe celebrated the dedication of a new mosaic-decorated bridge named in his honor. The Larry Monroe Forever Bridge, on East Side Drive at the park’s southwest edge, features hundreds of finely detailed tiles. Most of them relate to the music Monroe played on the radio for more than 30 years as a DJ with Sun Radio and KUT before his death in January 2014 at age 71. Monroe’s partner, Ave Bonar, was the driving force in the bridge’s creation, with artist Stefanie Distefano directing the months-long process of tilemaking with about 100 volunteers. More than 300 donors contributed nearly $25,000 through a crowdfunding effort to cover costs, which included paying to have the small neighborhood bridge closed for the past two weeks while the tiles were installed.” https://shar.es/1qm69o

Frozen lasagna packaged in Central Texas, part of a fast-growing industry.

Frozen lasagna packaged in Central Texas, part of a fast-growing industry.

FOOD + BUSINESS: How Central Texas became a hotbed for packaged food business. Taken from Addie Broyle‘s story in the American-Statesman. “The Austin packaged food economy is as hot as the restaurant scene, and its reach extends far beyond the boundaries of Central Texas and into the shopping carts, refrigerators and pantries of grocery shoppers from coast to coast. Hundreds of companies call Austin home, from established homegrown brands like Stubb’s, Primizie, Beanitos and Vital Farms to booming transplants such as Skinny Pop, one of the biggest ready-to-eat popcorn companies in the country, which recently moved its headquarters from Chicago to Austin for warmer weather and livability for its top executives. On a national scale, small to midsize consumer packaged goods companies have taken $18 billion from the pockets of the largest food companies in the past five years, and a healthy portion of that money is flowing through Central Texas. Other parts of the country, especially the Upper Midwest, where mega food companies such as Kraft, General Mills and Kellogg have long been based, have far more institutional knowledge to launch and manufacture products. Austin’s history is shorter.” https://shar.es/1qm648

Gov. Greg Abbott last month signed into law House Bill 4, which will direct $130 million to pre-K, one of the governor's top priorities in the legislative session.

Gov. Greg Abbott last month signed into law House Bill 4, which will direct $130 million to pre-K, one of the governor’s top priorities in the legislative session.

POLITICS: Greg Abbott: The Calm after the Rick Perry Storm. Taken from Jonathan Tilove‘s story in the American-Statesman: “It was the “Father’s Day Massacre,” as Rick Perry ended his first legislative session as governor in 2001 with a bloody Sunday flourish, vetoing 79 bills in a single day, and 83 bills altogether, an all-time record. But this Father’s Day, Gov. Greg Abbott is home with his family before heading up to Dallas to address the National Veterans Wheelchair Games. He finished poring over the last of the more than 1,406 bills and resolutions sent to his desk by the 84th session of the Texas Legislature at 2 a.m. Saturday. That’s 46 hours ahead of the midnight Sunday deadline after which anything he hasn’t acted on automatically becomes law. His veto tally of 42 bills — many strictly local in application or containing what the governor considered a legal flaw — put his last stamp on a session that was conservative in both outcome and temperament. Following 14 years of Rick Perry, Greg Abbott is the calm after the storm.” https://shar.es/1qmGMH

Gary Cartwright reading one of his books, “Galveston,” at his home in Austin in 1999. Photo: Taylor Johnson.

Gary Cartwright reading one of his books, “Galveston,” at his home in Austin in 1999. Photo: Taylor Johnson.

MEDIA + BOOKS: A legendary Texas writer details his work and his failings. Taken from Charles Ealy‘s story in the American-Statesman: “Gary Cartwright takes a traditional, chronological approach to writing his memoir, “The Best I Recall,” starting with his early life in West Texas and his teen years in Arlington, then discussing his military service, his education and his rise through journalism — during which he crafted some of the most interesting stories to ever come from the state. The memoir also includes a sizable amount of rather frank information about his rough-and-tumble private life. But most of the book focuses on his exploits while at Texas Monthly, starting in the 1970s, when he wrote about the Fort Worth case of millionaire oilman Cullen Davis, who was charged with shooting his estranged wife, Priscilla, and murdering her lover, Stan Farr, and her teenage daughter, Andrea. Cartwright’s coverage eventually evolved into a book, “Blood Will Tell,” and a four-part TV movie.” https://shar.es/1qm6gu


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