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Michael Barnes

True Colors Shake the Hate for ADL, Art of the Gala by Giving City, Ditch the Tux, Longhorn Jack Chivigny

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Ben Kogut, Karine Gordon and Elan Gordon at True Colors Shake the Hate for the Anti-Demanation League at Fair Market.

Ben Kogut, Karine Gordon and Elan Gordon at True Colors Shake the Hate for the Anti-Demanation League at Fair Market.

NIGHTLIFE: True Colors Shake the Hate for ADL. Once an Austin nonprofit reaches a certain stage of maturity, it suddenly grows young. Leaders in their 20s and 30s gather prop up their own umbrella. They stage their own benefits. They blossom. Just a few years ago, the Anti-Defamation League of Austin, which fights bigotry and bullying of all sorts, held its first True Colors cocktail party for 60 mostly young people at an ultra-modern home in South Austin. Last night, True Colors uncoiled in the vast spaces of Fair Market events venue on East Fifth Street. The night’s Shake the Hate theme meant all sorts of dancing from guests and entertainers. No final tally is in, but I heard that 650 people attended and that backers hoped to raise as much as $250,000. Former ADL chair, now Mayor Steve Adler addressed the cheering masses. Two outstanding young philanthropists, Courtney Caplan and Jason Berkowitz, were honored. Co-Chairs Julie Franklin and Ben Kogut kept everything upbeat and on point. Since folks like these will be running the show someday, I predict ADL’s — and Austin’s — future is bright.

11993176_1153224901361657_43251577_oCHARITY: Art of the Gala staged by Giving City. Posted on Facebook by Patrick Landrum: “Some were there to jump start their events, some desperate for a starting point on a first gala. Others scoping out the best vendors, many finding out about “the ask”, and some like me, catching up with the best and brightest in Austin non-profit fundraising. We all got way more than we bargained for! Thank you shout out to GivingCity AustinAustin Social PlannerKeep Austin GivingFour Seasons Hotel AustinMandarin Design Lab for putting this on! Thanks to the panel Monica Maldonado WilliamsLance Avery MorganCarla Stanmyre McDonaldMichael Barnes, and Marji Calvert. And special thanks to my three table leaders Heath HaleKate Perez, and Brooke Clark Rogers!”

Ross Bennett models dark denim, a blue dinner jacket, a white button-down shirt and purple velvet loafers. Photo: Laura Skelding.

Ross Bennett models dark denim, a blue dinner jacket, a white button-down shirt and purple velvet loafers. Photo: Laura Skelding.

STYLE: Ditch the tux during Austin’s fall social season. Taken from my story in the Statesman: “In the United Kingdom, it isn’t a five-star social occasion without highly specialized apparel, behavior and forms of address. Hierarchy-minded hosts dream about the appearance of at least one royal. These standards are set by arbiters such as Debrett’s, which also publishes lists of the country’s aristocracy and guides to modern manners. In Austin, our social seasons — fall and spring — are far less formal or regal. Sure, heads might turn if Willie Nelson, Michael Dell, Sandra Bullock or Matthew McConaughey elbows through the assembled masses with some finger food balanced on a tiny plastic plate. For the most part, however, even our top-drawer events are pretty low-key. Despite the proliferation of galas, receptions, openings, seated dinners, cocktail parties and pop-up lounges, fewer male guests, for instance, are hauling out the old tuxedos and black bow ties. Forget white-tie decorum altogether.”

Texas football coach Jack Chevigny (right), shown speaking to some of his Longhorns players, is the only UT coach to have a losing record during his tenure. But he did lead the Longhorns to a big win over Notre Dame in 1934, a game that was played in South Bend.

Texas football coach Jack Chevigny (right), shown speaking to some of his Longhorns players, is the only UT coach to have a losing record during his tenure. But he did lead the Longhorns to a big win over Notre Dame in 1934, a game that was played in South Bend.

SPORTS: He won one for the Gipper, then coached the Longhorns pasts Notre Dame. Fantastic story from John Mayer about Jack Chivigny: “This weekend, Charlie Strong’s Longhorns will try to achieve something a Texas football team has accomplished only once — beat Notre Dame in South Bend. The faint echoes they’ll try to wake up there stretch way back to 1934, a game that stunned sports fans and thrust Texas football onto a national stage. That 7-6 triumph for the Longhorns was engineered by a coach who not only was a former Notre Dame player, but also the Fighting Irish’s celebrated running back who had “won one for the Gipper” by scoring a touchdown against Army in 1928, after Knute Rockne’s legendary halftime speech.”

CORRECTION: A previous version of this post published an incorrect amount raised by True Colors for ADL.