Five Austin parties we loved so much

One can relax during the Feed the Peace Awards for the Nobelity Project at the Four Seasons Austin Hotel. You know why? Because even when the AV system crashes or a stray joke bombs, Turk and Christy Pipkin are going to smile, glide back on stage and make it all better.

Wardaleen Belvin and Sherry Matthews at Feed the Peace for Nobelity Project.

The highlight of the most recent event was a speech by honoree Dan Rather who gave an oration about today’s crises so timely and rousing that every statesman wishes he or she had written and delivered it. He’s truly a treasure. I didn’t stay long enough to witness the plaudits for the Flatlanders, but they surely deserved the recognition.

RELATED: Turk and Christy Pipkin have transformed charitable giving in Austin.

How to throw a party

Nina and Frank Seely are candidates for the best party hosts in town. Their afternoon spread for a perfectly poised Valentine’s soiree was what every guest hopes will greet them from a party buffet. The crowd fit the room and the room the crowd. Can we talk about the social star power? Carla McDonaldVenus StrawnWendi Kushner, George Elliman, Eva WomackLarry ConnellyDonna Stockton Hicks, Margo SawyerLance Avery Morgan, Rob Giardinelli, Nona NilandPatty HoffpauirGreg EasleyJames Bryant, Richard Hartgrove and Gary Cooper were just some of the highlights.

RELATED: How ballet won over the hippies at the Armadillo World Headquarters.

Jill Kuhn and Bob Fuentes at the opening of “Vaudeville” at the Ransom Center.

Two magnets

Two opening receptions made me very happy about my alma mater, the University of Texas at Austin. There’s growing excitement about the maturing cultural attractions on or near campus. One week apart, we attended “Vaudeville” at the Ransom Center and “Form into Spirit: Ellsworth Kelly‘s Austin” at the Blanton Museum of Art. Both were mobbed with fans. Within fairly easy walking distance are the LBJ Presidential LibraryBriscoe Center for American History, Bullock Texas State History Museumthe UT Visual Arts Center and more than a dozen public art projects from the Landmarks program, all worthy of sustained attention. Good times.

RELATED: Ellsworth Kelly crowns Austin with an artistic jewel.

‘Masters of Dance’

Although traditional story ballets and evening-length concept concerts are always welcome, I’m partial to short abstract pieces, such as the three on display during “Masters of Dance” from Ballet Austin at the Long Center. Reserve time for dance at its purest: music and movement aided by minimal design elements. Loved the furling and unfurling, folding and unfolding to Philip Glass‘s music in Justin Peck’s “In Creases.” Enjoyed the beskirted, stuttering angularity of Pam Tanowitz’s “Shade.” David L. Lang‘s music for it? Not so much, despite conductor Peter Bay‘s valiant efforts. The third slot was reserved for a revival of Stephen Mills‘s rhythmically mesmerizing “Kai” set to the percussion of composer John Cage. I’d see this again and again for as long as dancers dance.

RELATED: Ballet Austin explores love, death and sex with “Belle Redux.”

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