Last chance to hit the best of Austin spring party circuit

Soon it will be hot. Very hot. For many, too hot to party in Austin. That’s why we urge you to savor the last semblance of spring and hit this circuit of more than 40 parties hard.

April 26: Little Artist, Big Artist for Chula League. Mondo Gallery.

April 27-29: Austin Food + Wine Festival. Auditorium Shores and Fair Market.

April 27-28: Texas Burlesque Fest. Paramount Theatre.

April 28: Putting on the Ritz Gala for Sam Bass Theatre. Marriott North La Frontera.

April 28: Songs for Trees for TreeFolks. Lemon Lounge.

April 28: Town Lake Links 30th Anniversary Celebration. UT campus locations.

April 28: Council on At-Risk Youth Distinguished Speaker Event. AT&T Conference Center.

April 28: Viva EASB! for Elizabeth Ann Seton Board. Camp Mabry.

April 29: An Afternoon in Neverland from Ballet Austin Guild. Driskill Hotel.

April 29: A Marvelous Party: Delovely for Penfold Theatre. Kindred Oaks.

April 29: Bollywood Meets Borscht Belt from Hindu Charities and Shalom Austin. JCC Community Hall.

May 1: Great Futures Spring Luncheon for Boys & Girls Clubs. Fairmont Austin Hotel.

May 1: Hope Awards for iACT. Bullock Texas State History Museum.

May 2: Taste of Mexico for Mexic-Arte Museum. Brazos Hall.

May 3: I Heart HealthStart Gala. Gather Austin.

May 3: Opal Divine’s American Whiskey Festival. Austin City Hotel.

May 3: Evening of Honors for Heman Sweatt Symposium on Civil Rights. UT Alumni Center.

May 4: The Blue Bash for Austin Chamber Music Center. River Place Country Club.

May 4: Best Party Ever for Leadership Austin. Brazos Hall.

May 4: Austin Book Awards for Austin Library Foundation. Austin Central Library.

May 4: HeartGift Gala. JW Marriott Hotel.

May 4: Texas Monthly Live. Paramount Theatre.

May 5: Red, Hot and Soul. Zach Theatre.

May 5-6: Pecan Street Festival. East Sixth Street.

May 5: Down & Derby for the Shade Project. Mercury Hall.

May 6: Urban Roots Austin Tour de Farm. Fair Market.

May 8: Philanthropitch Austin. LBJ Auditorium.

May 8: Shoal Creek Awards. Cirrus Logic Conference Space.

May 9: Farm to Plate for Sustainable Food Center. Barr Mansion.

May 10: Due West: West Austin Studio Tour kick-off party. Central Austin Library Gallery.

May 10: Official Drink of Austin Party for Austin Food and Wine Alliance. Fairmont Austin Hotel.

May 11: Reach for the Stars Gala for Ann Richards School Foundation. Four Seasons Hotel.

May 11: Emancipet Luncheon. Hyatt Regency Austin.

May 12: Paramount Gala with the Gipsy Kings. Paramount Theatre.

May 12: Mother’s Day Jazz Brunch for the Frederick Douglass Club of Austin. Crowne Plaza Austin.

May 14: There’s No Such Thing As a Free Lunch for People’s Community Clinic. Four Seasons Hotel.

May 15: Spring For Water for Clean Water Action. Zilker Clubhouse.

May 17: Molly Awards Gala for the Texas Observer. Four Seasons Hotel.

May 19: Austin Under 40 Awards Gala. JW Marriott Hotel.

May 20: Cochon555 Culinary Competition. Four Seasons Hotel.

Meet 5 Austin Women of Distinction, 2 Young Masters

Each year, the Girls Scouts of Central Texas judiciously selects a small group of leaders to honor as Women of Distinction. They are saluted at a brisk, dignified luncheon, this year set for noon on April 26 at the AT&T Center. I always learn a lot at this event.

RELATED: Two dozen Austin parties you don’t want to miss.

Alexis Jones, founder of I Am That Girl. Contributed by Oprah.com

Alexis Jones (Rising Star Award) is the founder of nationally recognized organizations I Am That Girl and ProtectHer. She’s an author and motivational speaker for Generation Y, and named one of AOL’s Makers alongside Oprah Winfrey and Hillary Clinton.

Nora Comstock, Ph.D., is an entrepreneur and business leader, founder of Comstock Connections and national and international founder of Las Comadres Para Las Americas, current member of Austin Community College District Board of Trustees, and member of the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame.

Denise Davis, J.D, is the founding partner of Davis Kaufmann PLLC, lobbyist and former Texas House of Representatives deputy parliamentarian, advisor and attorney to two Texas Lt. Governors, and chief of staff for Texas House of Representative Speaker Joe Straus.

Laura Wolf, J.D, is executive director for CASA of Travis County Inc. She developed merger between Austin Rape Crisis Center and Center for Battered Women to create SafePlace, served as former President of the Austin Junior League, and is recipient of two national awards from CASA Inc.

Amy Shaw Thomas, J.D, is vice chancellor of academic and health affairs and an executive Oofficer at the University of Texas System, board member of Downtown Austin Alliance and Texas Methodist Foundation, active member of Austin Area Research Organization, and advocate for inclusion, diversity and meritocracy.

Young Masters

Described as a rock star of the classical violin (which might explain this rather wacky publicity pose), Austinite Charles Yang was a 2004 recipient of the Young Master award from Texas Cultural Trust. Contributed

Texas Cultural Trust, an arts advocacy group, has chosen 15 students for the 2018 class of Young Masters. Each of the promising artists receive a $10,000 scholarship over the course of two years to enhance their studies.

RELATED: Heidi Marquez Smith takes over at Texas Cultural Trust

Two are from our fair city: Ian Stripling Jenson, an 11th grader at McCallum Fine Arts Academy, has been selected in the music category for violin, and Leif Tilton, a ninthe grader at Bowie High School, has been selected in the music category for classical guitar.

Some of the past Young Masters recipients have gone on to glory, including Austinite Charles Yang, a 2004 honoree. The Boston Globe judged that this rising soloist “plays classical violin with the charisma of a rock star.” He also happens to play guitar.

Best Texas books: Lead off with this John Graves literary memoir

These new Texas books — plus one minor classic — reminds us how much is worth reading about our state in early 2018.

“Myself and Strangers: A Memoir of Apprenticeship.” John Graves. University of Texas Press.

One could effortlessly make the argument that John Graves is among the finest authors Texas ever produced. Yet few readers venture beyond his masterpiece, “Goodbye to a River.” This literary memoir, first published in 2004 and spliced with excerpts from Graves’ journal from the 1950s, explains a lot about how he became who he became. A son of Fort Worth, he was educated in a gentlemanly manner at Rice Institute in Houston. He served in the Pacific Theater during World War II before earning his master’s degree from Columbia University in New York. He came away from that experience with a lingering antipathy toward Ivy League types and wanted to plunge instead into the peripatetic life of an expat writer, much like dozens of other American authors before and after the war. This memoir covers mostly his time in Spain and the Canary Islands and records his drinking bouts, love affairs, manly friendships, jagged interactions with other expats, as well as fishing, hunting and sailing trips. Sound like Hemingway? The great man is always in the background of this book and Graves even spots his putative role model a couple times in Spain. The Graves attitude and style is already well developed in the journal entries, although, as he points out, his return to Texas gave him his subject.

“All Over the Map: True Heroes of Texas Music.” Michael Corcoran. University of North Texas Press.

Advice: Read this book with your favorite music streaming device at hand. You’ll want to listen to every artist described by Corcoran, formerly of the American-Statesman and other publications, in this revised version of his 2005 book about key Texas artists. You learn new things about some of them, such as Willie Nelson, Buddy Holly and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Others are musical pioneers who might sound familiar, but Corcoran, an historian as much as a journalist, has tracked down exactly what you need to know. The backstories about what he could or could not discover are as compelling as his authoritative takes on the 42 artists’ histories and musical contributions. Corcoran has chosen fantastic images for this UNT Press edition, and he doesn’t waste a word. As he did during his Statesman years, he can make other writers wish they’d produced this work. The book will wait at eye-level on my Texas  reference shelves for as long as they are standing.

“Hometown Texas.” Photographs by Peter Brown. Stories by Joe Holley. Trinity University Press.

Like Corcoran, Holley has written for major newspapers and magazines. Also like Corcoran, he writes in a tight, precise and yet sometimes expansive manner. To tell the truth, Holley and and I cover a good stretch of the same waterfront, but it is worth it to read about some familiar Texas subjects because he is such an amiable storyteller. Other pieces, especially those with personal meaning for Holley, were completely new to me. Peter Brown’s photographs of small-town or rural Texas open wide and put the subject matter front and center. Nothing tricky here. His instincts and training lead him to the right image time and again. At times, though, one wishes the images raised by Holley were duplicated by Brown. But that’s another book. I know I will keep dipping into this collection of compelling Texas stories that doubles as a handsome picture book.

“The Broken Spoke: Austin’s Legendary Honky-Tonk.” Donna Marie Miller. Texas A&M Press.

Donna Marie Miller’s ace in the hole is her generous access to James and Annetta White, who have run Austin’s legendary Broken Spoke honky-tonk since 1964. It’s clear that Miller warmly admires the White family and cherishes their stories. Her delight is infectious. She sketches out the early years — White grew up not far from our South Austin house! — then records how every family member pitched in when the Broken Spoke opened. One might wish for a little more on the background of the country music and dance styles that flourished at the honky-tonk, but Miller more than makes up for that with accounts of the legends of music that played there and the very localized culture that thrived on the east side of South Lamar Boulevard. Put this on the shelf next to Eddie Wilson’s knock-out 2017 “Armadillo World Headquarters.” Then look up Corcoran’s digital “Austin Clubland.”

ALSO READ: The definitive history of Austin’s Armadillo World Headquarters.

“Thursday Night Lights: The Story of Black High School Football in Texas.” Michael Hurd. University of Texas Press.

Another journalist who has become a historian is Michael Hurd, a former sportswriter for the American-Statesman and other publications. He’s seen a lot. And he understands the connections between sports, especially football, and other, often riven cultural expressions of our state. Until the (white) University Interscholastic League and the (black) Prairie View Interscholastic League merged in 1967, teams from segregated high schools in the same towns or cities played in the same stadiums. African-Americans took the field on Thursdays, Anglos on Fridays. Hurd is especially good on his hometown of Houston, which supported multiple black high schools with blazing rivalries. Now director of Prairie View A&M University’s Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture, Hurd soaks up stories from small towns and big cities. He provides accounts of state championship games in his appendices and, crucially, he reminds us that integration also meant the loss of pride and identity for those who attended black high schools that had excelled at academics and athletics. Even the darkened image of players on the dusk jacket affirms that this is a chapter of our state’s history that must come to light.

MORE TEXAS BOOKS WE LOVE: Late 2017.

MORE TEXAS BOOKS WE LOVE: Fall 2017.

MORE TEXAS BOOKS WE LOVE: Summer 2017.

MORE TEXAS BOOKS WE LOVE: Spring 2017.

MORE TEXAS BOOKS WE LOVE: Fall 2016.

See who in Austin are AU40 Awards finalists

One of Austin’s most coveted honors, the Austin Under 40 Awards, are back, and we’ve got the names of the 2018 finalists.

Gordon Moore and Heather McKissick at the 2014 Austin Under 40 Awards. Contributed by Jonathan Garza

The AU40 Awards are a joint effort of two veteran volunteer groups, Young Women’s Alliance and the Young Men’s Business League. They honor notable community figures and rising stars in 16 career fields.

RELATED: Matt Curtis sings the praises of the AU40 Awards.

The 2018 AU40 Gala will be held at the JW Marriott on May 19. The money raised benefits the YWA Foundation and the Austin Sunshine Camps.

RELATED: Sunshine Camps shine.

I suspect that some of these finalists will be running our city some day.

2018 AU40 AWARDS FINALISTS

Architecture, and Design

Ada Corral

Adam Nyer

Matthew Hoglund

Megan Lasch

Patrice Rios

Arts, Media and Entertainment

Cassandra King Polidori

David Messier

Livia Pope

Taylor Ellison

Terry Pierre-Mitchell

Civics, Government and Public Affairs

Dana Harris

David Edmonson

Jo Cassandra Cuevas

Virginia Cumberbatch

Yvette Ruiz

Culinary Arts, Events and Hospitality

C.K. Chin

Cassie LaMere

Fallon Gaskamp-Allison

John Antonelli

Kendall Antonelli

Energy, Mobility and Transportation

Jennifer Duthie

Kelly Daniel

Mica Vehik

Phillip Lay

Suzanne King

Innovation and Start-up

Adam Lyons

Caroline Freedman

R.C. Rondero de Mosier

Stephanie Hansen

Whitney Wolfe Herd

Financial and Insurance Services

Donald Park

Eric Hare

Jeff Socha

Kerri Swope

Lindsey Leaverton

Journalism, Marketing and Public Relations

BA Snyder

Hema Muller

Jamie Chandlee

Jessica Scanlon

Kristie Gonzales

Legal

Adam Nagorski

Courtney Dickey

Jaren Lindauer

Lauren Schoenbaum

Sujata Ajmera

Medicine and Healthcare

David Shackelford

John Fought

Richard Bottner

Sarah Saxon

Vinit Varu MD

Nonprofit Service

Derrick Lesnau

Kandace Vallejo

Mary Van Haneghan

Meme Styles

Raquel Valdez

Real Estate

Blair Nelson

Emily Chenevert

Laura Brady

Lizzy Jarvis

Wade Giles

Sports, Wellness and Fitness

Alex Earle

Carly Pollack

Chi Chi Randolph

Marc Tucci

Robin Emmerich

Technology

Joah Spearman

Michael Manning

Sara Ines-Calderon

Shruti Anand

Tricia Katz

Youth and Education

Anneliese Tanner

Ashley Alaniz-Moyer

Jennifer Garcia

Lucas Janda

Sean Duffy

Mentor of the Year

Fayruz Benyousef

Kali’ Rourke

Laura Sovine

Matt Swinney

Toya Bell

 

Austin parties we love: Early 2018

After a holiday break, the Austin social scene warms up rapidly. Peek at some parties we eagerly anticipate.

Jan. 27: Opening night of Austin Opera’s “Ariadne auf Naxos.” Long Center.

Jan. 27: Dell Children’s Gala. Austin Convention Center.

Jan. 27: Human Rights Campaign Austin Gala. JW Marriott.

Jan. 31: Promise to Children Award Luncheon for Camp Fire Central Texas. St. David’s Episcopal Church.

Feb. 2: Angelina Eberly Luncheon for Austin History Center Association. Driskill Hotel.

Feb. 3: Rodeo Austin Gala with Jack Ingram, Bruce Robison and Charlie Robison. Palmer Events Center.

Feb. 3: Casablanca for CASA of Travis County. JW Marriott.

Feb. 3: Corazón Awards for Con Mi Madre. After-party with Bidi Bidi Band. Brazos Hall.

Feb. 3: Puppy Bowl for Austin Humane Society. 124 W. Anderson Lane.

Feb. 3: Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner for Project Transitions. The Thinkery and other venues.

Feb. 10: Winemaker Valentine Luncheon. Fall Creek Vineyards.

Feb. 10: Carnaval Brasileiro. Palmer Events Center.

Feb. 11: The Nobelity Project’s Feed the Peace Awards. Four Seasons Hotel.

Feb. 11: Women’s Symphony League presents Red Haute Valentine Party. Omni Barton Creek Resort.

Feb. 12: Austin Blues Revue and mixer. Antone’s Nightclub.

Feb. 15: Rockin’ Round Up for Any Baby Can. ACL Live.

 

Sneak peek: Con Mi Madre’s big-hearted Corazón Awards

We’ve made no secret of our admiration for Teresa Granillo and her group, Con Mi Madre, which guides Latinas and their mothers through the educational system. They are setting up a national model with their record of what works and what does not.
Well, the group’s big annual benefit, the Corazón Awards, comes up soon Feb. 3 at Brazos Hall.
The 2017 Con Mi Madre’s Corazón Awards and Gala at Brazos Hall. Contributed
Here’s a sneak peek at the 2018 honorees.
Con Mi Madre Award

Judith Loredo

Corazón Award

Congressman Lloyd Doggett

Mariposa Awards

Austin Independent School District

The Colmenero Family

Google

Sandy Segura Alcalá

Cindy Maciel-Reyes

Sonia Briseño Castellanos

El Paso Independent School District

The Junior League of Austin

Trellis Foundation

The University of Texas Steve Hicks School of Social Work

Best Austin parties for an incredibly artful time

Design, photography and visual art count big in Austin’s social swirl this week.

Nov. 8: Austin Design Week Studio Tour. 4704A E. Cesar Chavez St.

Nov. 9: Pop Austin VIP Opening Night Party. Fair Market.

Nov. 9: Struggle for Justice: Four Decades of Civil Rights Photography reception. Briscoe Center for American History.

Nov. 9: A Night in Africa from African Leadership Bridge. Springdale Station.

Nov. 9: First Light: Preview Party for Creek Show. 708 E. Fifth St.

Nov. 9: Beat the Odds Benefit Concert with Pat Green. Stubbs.

Nov. 9 Due East Native Wildflower Dinner. Big Medium.

Nov. 9-12: Austin International Drag Festival. Various venues.

Nov. 10: ArtBash from Austin Alliance Austin. Native Hostel.

Nov. 10: Veteran’s Show from Austin Visual Arts Association. Austin ArtSpace.

Nov. 10: University of Texas Distinguished Alumnus Awards. UT Alumni Center.

Nov. 11-12: East Austin Studio Tour. Various venues.

Nov. 11: Patriots Ball. Georgetown Sheraton Hotel.

Nov. 12: Umlauf Presents Bernstein 100 Austin. Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum.

Nov. 12: Seton Development Board Gala salutes Luci Baines Johnson. Fairmont Austin.

 

Best parties for this rapturous Austin weather

What could go better with this glorious late October weather than unfettered socializing with fellow Austinites?

Oct. 26-Nov. 3: Austin Film Festival. Various locations.

Oct. 26: Fall Fundraiser for Pease Park Conservancy. Ella Hotel.

Oct. 26: Future Luncheon for Austin Ed Fund. Fairmont Hotel.

Oct. 26: Amazon in Austin for Rainforest Partnership. 800 Congress Ave.

Oct. 27: Tito’s Prize Winner Zack Ingram show reception. Big Medium Gallery.

Oct. 27: Women of Distinction Awards Luncheon for TAMACC. Four Seasons Hotel.

Oct. 28: Spooktacular. Bullock Texas State History Museum.

Oct. 28: Bulltober Fest. Rodeo Austin HQ, 9100 Decker Lake Road.

Oct. 28: Viva La Vida for Day of the Dead. Mexic-Arte Museum.

Oct. 28: Eye Ball for Rude Mechs. Springdale Station.

Oct. 28: Austin Central Library Grand Opening. 710 West Cesar Chavez St.

Oct. 28: Zach Costume Bash. Bobbi Pavilion.

Oct. 28: Austin Sunshine Camps Carnival. Zilker Lodge & Pavilion.

Oct. 28: Barbecue on the Pedernales for Friends of the LBJ National Historical Park. LBJ Ranch

Oct. 29: All ATX for HAAM, SIMS, Black Fret and Austin Music Foundation. Auditorium Shores.

Oct. 29: Empty Bowls Project. Dripping Springs Ranch Park and Event Center.

Oct. 30: Andy Roddick Foundation Gala. ACL Live.

 

Find out the Philanthropy Day Award winners ahead of time

The Austin nonprofit community perks up every year for the Philanthropy Day Awards, given out by the Austin chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

Tito Beveridge hand packs cases of 1.7 liter bottles of his handcrafted Tito’s Vodka. Rodolfo Gonzalez/American-Statesman

These honors are chosen by the pros! The following individuals and groups will be applauded during a luncheon at the JW Marriott on Feb. 8.

A special bravo goes out to the always generous Bert “Tito” Beveridge and Tito’s Handmade Vodka. Given the recent evaluation from Forbes valuing his company at $2.5 billion, however, Tito’s might more accurately qualify in the Large Corporation category.

RELATED: This Austin vodka maker is now one of the richest people in America.

Outstanding Philanthropists:
NANCY AND NYLE MAXWELL
Nominated by Seton Foundation, Dell Children’s Medical Center Foundation

Outstanding Philanthropic Large Corporation:
APPLIED MATERIALS
Nominated by Breakthrough Central Texas

Outstanding Philanthropic Small or Medium Corporation:
TITO’S HANDMADE VODKA
Nominated by Seton Foundation, Miracle Foundation

Outstanding Philanthropic Foundation/Organization:
ST. DAVID’S FOUNDATION
Nominated by YMCA of Austin, AGE of Central Texas

Outstanding Volunteer Fundraiser:
MAC McELWRATH
Nominated by KIPP Austin Public Schools

Kelly Davidson Memorial Outstanding Philanthropic Youth:
SPENCER SARTIN
Nominated by The Livestrong Foundation, Cyclists Combating Cancer

Outstanding Fundraising Professional:
DONNA EMERY
Nominated by Christie Bybee, ABE Charitable Foundation Inc.

Special Recognition:
DR. PASCAL “PAT” FORGIONE, JR.
 Nominated by the Christi Center

Best Austin parties blasting out before ACL Music Fest

Austin society rushes to wrap up activity before the ACL Music Festival, which kicks off Oct. 6 at Zilker Park.

Contributed

Sept. 29: Celebrate Children in Nature for Westcave Preserve. Four Seasons.

Sept. 29: American Indian Heritage Day. Bullock Texas State History Museum.

Sept. 30: Austin Area Urban League. JW Marriott.

Oct. 1: Far East Fest: Asian Food Festival. American-Statesman grounds.

Oct. 1: Lifetime Learning Institute turns 40. Red Oak Ball Room.

Oct. 1: Musical Salon for Austin Shakespeare with Jill Blackwood and Shelley Auer. Private Home.

Dick Clark. Contributed

Oct. 1: Dick Clark: A Tribute. Paramount Theatre.

Oct. 1: Austin Wine Experience for Wine & Food Foundation of Texas. AT&T Center.

Oct. 1: Big Co-Op Fair for Wheatsville Food Co-Op. 4001 S. Lamar Blvd.

Oct. 1: Rock for Relieve from Band Aid School of Music. 2309 Thornton Road.

Oct. 2: It takes 2 to Two-Step for Austin Book Arts Center. White Horse Bar.

Oct. 4: Party for the Parks to benefit Austin Parks Foundation. Brazos Hall.

Oct. 5: Chef Auction for Edible Austin. Allan House.

Oct 5: Beauty of Life for Hospice Austin. JW Marriott.

Oct. 5: Generosi-Tea for Boys & Girls Clubs of the Austin Area. Hotel Ella.

Oct. 6: Celebration Luncheon for the Safe Alliance. JW Marriott.